Wednesday, February 16

Smelly Side of Cold Weather

If It's Wool That's Doing This, Why Only the Left Foot?
Cold weather can be tough on cyclists. This year, I had problems in the cold weather I'd never experienced before. Foot problems. More specifically, LEFT foot problems. Blisters and sore spots. I have no idea why, other than they appeared with the regular use of warm wool socks and disappeared this week with the return of light socks in our warmer weather.

Allergy? Perhaps, but I can't imagine any allergy that only afflicts ONE foot. The RIGHT foot didn't behave abnormally in any way.

Some things might remain mysterious forever more. They didn't explain this in bicycle school! While I imagine this might be related to the tendency of the third foot on my left toe to get numb on occasion while riding, I do not have any good explanation for things...

9 comments:

Oldfool said...

Aging is not symmetrical. So now its started. Many surprises are ahead and they come quicker and quicker increasing exponentially.

PaddyAnne said...

Wow! I was a bit scared to read this post, not knowing what it may be about. As to why it would start then stop with wool socks I have no answers.

Janice in GA said...

I have just recently starting having odd sore spots on a couple of toes on my left foot only too. I have no idea why either. I wear wool socks all the time, so I can't imagine that's what it is.

It might have something to do with toes getting squashed together sometimes. But why only the left foot? Annoying.

limom said...

I dislike blisters.
Boy, that picture makes me want to go out and high five someone.

Khal said...

More compression with heavy socks?

RANTWICK said...

I'm more interested in imagining how you took that picture. I'm hoping you looked kinda funny.

cycler said...

Your left foot might be larger, thus more compressed.

Ed W said...

Sometimes those heavy wool socks woven with thicker yarn can be the problem. They simply produce more friction. One solution is to wear a thin sock under the thick one. Try a wicking liner sock or even a nylon dress sock. It reduces friction.

That's an old backpacker tip. It works well for hockey skates too.

Steve A said...

Several commenters undoubtedly are correct, at least in part. My left boot slips on less easily than my right one, and my left ski boot is a tighter fit. I think the left foot is more misshapen as well. Certainly, I get bad bruises on my left big toe when I've been skiing hard while the right one fares much better. I fear that Oldfool is on the mark about things. I never used to get numb toes on the left foot...

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